Archive by Author | dionnepelan

Watercolour For Everyone

Video by Rudolf.

Watercolour For Everyone was a 6-session course held at the UBC Learning Exchange and was lead by Vancouver artist Rudolf Kurt Penner (winter 2013). The video above is an excerpt from one of the classes.

Check out Rudolf’s website here

Watercolour examples on the Internet

Beautiful watercolour paintings

Painting stones

Painting a natural landscape

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Working at the Learning Exchange

As an intern at the UBC Learning Exchange, I’ve been very appreciative of the time and opportunity I’ve had to chat and interact with some of the many patrons from around the neighbourhood accessing the space; a space wherein, truly no day is the same.

Specifically, I’ve enjoyed developing a political discussion group with community members who frequently enter the space during drop-in afternoon hours. Its basis has been to foster a place for patrons to voice their opinions where they do not usually have a platform to. It’s been an experience, recognizing my own mistakes in what it takes to conceive of community and trust in this regard. I’ve wanted to make sure I could differentiate from the many attempts that are, though well-meaning, often exploitive of community members and residents of the Downtown Eastside. The neighbourhood itself, albeit facing gentrification and so many other struggles, is a great lesson in the paradigm of community.

An important task of mine has been to help out and be there on support during Drop-in afternoon hours. These afternoons have been nothing short of a blast. Busy and hectic, they contrast the formulaic forms of traditional learning and engagement. Coffee, computers, life discussion, and a myriad of anecdotes help to make the afternoons memorable. This is the time when anyone in the community can come into the Exchange to access the space and use computers, with assistance available should they need it. It is an attempt to bridge the digital divide that creates systemic barriers for individuals without any connections to computer education. Because the space is also used as a tool to seek company with other community members, I can see why it is upheld as a safer space for many patrons.

I believe that I’m fortunate to be have been given the chance to work with people in having discussions around current affairs and reaching out to other organizations around the neighbourhood. It seems to me that my time working at the UBC Learning Exchange will heighten my capacities for both community activism and civic engagement. And of course it has demonstrated a great introduction into Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and endeavors to cultivate solidarity with its residents.

~ Tania Ehret

The Oasis Mural Project

Watch this video, by Kim Villagante, on the Oasis Mural: A project outside a Neighbourhood Housing Society site. Visit it at East Hastings between Carol and Columbia.

Building a Web Page One Layer at a Time

Check out this YouTube video created by MackonLine.  It’s a creative little video about what he learned when updating the deLuxe Junk Co. website, something that was both fun and educational for him.

MackonLine is an IT Facilitator with the Learning Exchange’s Contributing Through Computers Program

Want to Play Guitar?

By Wayne Parenteau

There are easy to learn steps for beginners to be able to play simple songs using a three to four chord structure technique. These are suitable for anyone who’s interested in learning guitar at the beginning stages.  By learning these techniques you can learn to play your favourite songs.  It won’t make you a rock star right away, but it’s a good place to start.  The more you put into it the better you’ll feel about your playing.

Check out these four chords, they are used alot in Country and easy Rock songs like the Beatles and Rolling Stones.

What’s Important?

Strumming the guitar correctly

Reading cord charts

Practice practise practise – practise makes perfect.

 

If you want to learn more about basic guitar playing you can find me at the Learning Exchange where I do lessons on Tuesdays and Thursdays 1 – 5 PM.  The Learning Exchange is at 612 Main Street, near Keefer Street.

Memoirs of a Thanksgiving Superstar

BY AKO,

I’m in a bath. It’s a little too hot for me.
I’ll be patient for another special night.

I was in a spa this morning.
I saw somebody having oil treatment next to me.
Her skin looked so smooth like a new born baby.
I couldn’t wait to have oil on me.
I wish I had silence during my massage.
I heard someone say I look yummy.

After that, I was in a tanning studio.
I thought it was too hot, and I was there too long.
Somebody rescued me to the stove top, and put a gorgeous shiny blanket on me.
I felt a little stuffed, but it was a nice time. No one paid any attention to me.

Look at me!!
My goose bumped skin became shiny, crispy, and beautifully tanned.
I felt like a celebrity with everyone watching and talking about me.
I was proud of myself.

I’m in salty water with a garnished bouquet, and it’s a little too hot for me.
I hope my bones will be shiny and beautiful again.
It’s now very quiet around me.

Hey, I’m still here!
I’ll be shined again.

Ako is a member of the ESL Conversation Program Creative Writing Group

Welcome to Taloyoak, Nunavut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My name is Ronnie Napacheekadlak, I am from Taloyoak, Nunavut on the Boothia Peninsula.  Taloyak is a small isolated  community in the very far north.  It’s not a city, it has a small population of 900.

In the winter we go hunting for caribou (Tuqtu), fish, seals (netsiq) and other animals to help us eat through the winter.  Summers up there aren’t like summers in Vancouver, the days are way longer.  We have our own traditional Inuit games that are a lot harder than they sound.  Games like the kneel jump, the airplane, the mouth pull, and the knucklehop (which is my favourite).  To find out more about where I’m from check out this link: http://www.taloyoaknunavut.ca/ or check it out on Google maps by clicking here.  If you ever make it up north, here are some words you might find useful (borrowed from Omniglot.com) Quyanainni and enjoy:

English

Inuktitut

Welcome

Tunngahugit/Tunngasugit

Hello

Ainngai

How are you?

I’m fine, thanks. And you?

Qanuitpin/Qanuippit?

Qaniungi
Qanuinngittunga

Long time no see

Takunahaarnakuni

What’s your name?

My name is …

Kinauvit?

Uvanga …atira

Ujunga ….

Where are you from?

I’m from …

Huminngaaqpin
Nakinngaaqpit

nngaaqpunga

Pleased to meet you

Katigatkit Quvianaq

Alianaiq

Goodbye

Tavvaujutit – to one person
Tavvaujusi – to many people

Have a nice day

Ubluqatsiarit/Ulluqatsiarit

I don’t understand

Tukisinngittung

How do you say … in   Inuktitut?

…ni … qanuq uqauhiqaqpin?/uqausiqaqpit?

Excuse me

Iikuluga

How much does it cost?

Una Qapsit/Qassit/Qatsit?

Sorry

Iikuluk, Aittaaq, Nakujuq

Thank you

Response

Quyanainni, Quana, Ma’na
Qujannamiik, Nakurmiik

Ilaali

Where’s the toilet?

Naung anarvik?

Would you like to
dance with me?

Mumirluu?

Help!
Fire!
Stop!

Ikajuq!
Ikuma!
Ahu!/Asu!

Happy Birthday

Nalliuniqsiutsiarit

My hovercraft
is full of eels

Umiaryuap Publimaaqpaga tattaurniq ammayaq /
Umiarjuap Pullimmaqpaga tattaurniq nimiraq J